Continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis (CCPD)

Also known as automated peritoneal dialysis (APD), this method uses a machine (automated cycler) that performs multiple exchanges at night while you sleep. The cycler automatically fills your abdomen with dialysate, allows it to dwell there and then drains it to a sterile bag that you empty in the morning.

With CCPD APD :

You must remain attached to the machine for about 10 to 12 hours at night.
You aren’t connected to the machine during the day. But in the morning you begin one exchange with a dwell time that lasts the entire day.
You might have a lower risk of peritonitis because you connect and disconnect to the dialysis equipment less frequently than you do with CAPD.
To determine the method of exchange that’s best for you, your doctor will consider your medical condition, lifestyle and personal preferences. Your doctor might suggest certain modifications to individualize your program.

Results
Many factors affect how well peritoneal dialysis works in removing wastes and extra fluid from your blood. These factors include:

Your size APD
How quickly your peritoneum filters waste
How much dialysis solution you use
The number of daily exchanges
Length of dwell times
The concentration of sugar in the dialysis solution
To check if your dialysis is removing enough waste products, your doctor is likely to recommend tests, such as:

Peritoneal equilibration test (PET). This test compares samples of your blood and your dialysis solution during an exchange. The results indicate whether waste toxins pass quickly or slowly from your blood into the dialysate. That information helps determine whether your dialysis would be improved if the solution stayed in your abdomen for a shorter or longer time.
Clearance test. A blood sample and a sample of used dialysis solution are analyzed to determine how much of a certain waste product (urea) is being removed from your blood during dialysis. If you still produce urine, your doctor may also take a urine sample to measure its urea concentration.
If the test results show that your dialysis schedule is not removing enough wastes, your doctor might change your dialysis routine to:

Increase the number of exchanges
Increase the amount of dialysate you use for each exchange
Use a dialysate with a higher concentration of dextrose
You can improve your dialysis results and your overall health by eating the right foods, including foods low in sodium and phosphorus. A dietitian can help you develop an individualized meal plan. Your diet will be based on your weight, your personal preferences, and your remaining kidney function and other medical conditions, such as diabetes or high blood pressure APD.

Taking your medications as prescribed also is important for getting the best possible results. While receiving peritoneal dialysis, you’ll likely need various medications to control your blood pressure, stimulate production of red blood cells, control the levels of certain nutrients in your blood and prevent the buildup of phosphorus in your blood.

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